Monday, January 17, 2011

Dawnlight 1-2

Today I was at a workshop with Janet Skrepnek and we were working on a couple of paintings using only two colours, French ultramarine blue and burnt sienna.

We worked back and forth on the two paintings using the same colour mixtures. Painting one was a snow scene with the sky colour cast onto the snow and painting two was a misty morning scene of three trees.

Both paintings had graduated washes of burnt sienna for the sky colour.

In the first painting the wash was put down from the top of the sky to slightly below the halfway mark and then lightened to about a third from the bottom of the painting. It was set aside to allow it to dry.

In the second painting the sky was washed right down to the bottom of the painting.

While the paint was still wet a small amount of French ultramarine blue was added to the burnt sienna and the foreground grasses were painted into the bottom of the second painting.

Dawnlight 1

This same colour was then used to paint in the background treeline on the left side of the first painting.

A little more of the blue was added to the grass colour and a tree was painted into the right side of the second painting. Before the foreground grass could completely dry using the end of a brush the paper was lightly marked to create individual blades of grass.

This colour was used to paint in the slightly closer treeline on the right side of the first painting.

A little more blue was added to the tree colour and a slightly darker tree was painted into the left side of the second painting.


Dawnlight 2

This colour was then used in the first painting to create a stand of trees in the foreground of the first painting as well as some individual grasses sticking out of the snow.

Again more blue was added to the colour mixture creating a fairly dark mixture and the center tree was painted into the second painting and a few dark coloured growies were added into the foreground grasses.

This same colour was used on the first painting to create darker trees within the stand of trees and to add a little more colour in some of the grasses in the snow.